Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away

Tacit or Loud: where is the knowledge in art?
Symposium and festival for artistic research
Nov 16-Dec 3
 


Nov 30
Epistemology, embodiment and knowledge in the arts

Venue:
Inter Arts Center

Keynote:
Renderings of the Heart of Matter
9.30
Red Room

Choreo Graphia
9.30-18.00
Annex

Introduction to Choreo Graphia and [choreo]logy | carto[graphy]
10.30
Red Room

[choreo]logy | carto[graphy]
10.30-13.15
Seminar Room 2

Rehearsing
Reparative Critical Practices
11.00
Red Room

Sound hunting, Composer´s
intuition in action
11.45
Red Room

Afro-Acousmatic
13.15
Red Room

Thinking in
Performance
14.15
Red Room

The performer-instrument assemblage as a cybernetic system
15.00
Red Room

Dwelling In,
Breaking Out
16.00
Red Room

The Body in
the Music
16.45
Red Room

Discussion of [choreo] logy | carto [graphy] and
Choreo Graphia
17.30
Red room

Black Mountain College –
Practises and
models of creativity
18.00
Red Room

Presentation of “Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away”
18.30
White Room

Inde
20.30
Black Room

Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away
21.00
White Room

Abstracts and program notes

Keynote: Renderings of the Heart of Matter
Leena Rouhiainen


In this presentation, I will show a part of the video performance titled Renderings of the Heart of Matter (2012) that I constructed together with sound designer Antti Nykyri and videographer Riikka Theresa Innanen. The performance included dance performed by me in addition to the presented audio-visual video material. I will introduce the affective, emotional and embodied motif that initiated the artistic process and discuss the methods we used in devising the performance. In so doing, I will pay attention to two themes: I will discuss knowing from the perspective of what, after Shaun Gallagher (2012), might be termed an ecological-embodied-enactive understanding of phenomenology and contemplate what the affective in this perspective can be understood to entail. By taking the mentioned video performance as an example, I will also address what at the Theatre Academy of the University of the Arts Helsinki have called performative arrangements in artistic research. They are means of exploring, articulating and disseminating artistic problems that invoke complex relationships between things, beings and institutions. The mentioned video work encompasses embodied knowing in the form of multi-medial performative writing. By intermixing personal and shared artistic exploration and theoretical insights, this writing includes multiple perspectives, an interplay of voices, bodies and materials as well as is an emphatic response to a reading of affect theory.

Choreo Graphia

Marie Fahlin

Introduction to [choreo] logy | carto [graphy]

and Choreo Graphia
Rebecca Chentinell / Marie Fahlin

[choreo] logy | carto [graphy]

Rebecca Chentinell

[choreo]logy | carto[graphy] is a durational live event taking place in two parallel locations, the city of Malmö and the exhibition space inside Inter Arts Center. Three dancers are moving in and between places in the city according to an individual score based on working time, leisure time and free time. The movement of the dancers is verbally described and transmitted into the exhibition space. Through earphones the audience as well as the two cartographers / choreologists can hear the movement described by the dancers, which is then translated and traced into a graphical notation and map. [choreo]logy | carto[graphy] deals with the practices of choreography, choreology and cartography and how they can dissolve, emerge and be understood through each other. How can dance and choreography be understood through its notation? Where does the choreography take place and how does it materialize?

Rehearsing Reparative Critical Practices

Katrine Dirckinck-Holmfeld

In my artistic research PhD Rehearsing Reparative Critical Practices I expand on Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s notion of the ‘reparative reading’ - understood as a communal, historically dense exploration of fragments into new assemblages. While the ‘reparative reading’ have been embraced by literary and queer feminist criticism, in what Robyn Wiegman have called the ‘reparative turn’, I explore the possibility of shifting the reparative practice from a hermeneutics or reading as proposed by Sedgwick to artistic practices [image] in itself. As part of the methodological development I speculate on how the reparative informs a sensibility suitable for artistic research through a snowflake model oscillating between artistic production and theoretical reflection. For ‘Tacit or Loud’ I will present a work in process of the project Leap Into Colour: travelogue for a video installation, on the Armenian-Egyptian photographer Armenak (Armand) Arzrouni.

Sound hunting. Composer’s intuition in action
Ulla Pohjannoro

The paper discusses composer’s intuition, and its embodied dimension. The research is grounded on the results of the case study of a composer’s entire compositional process. The data was collected with stimulated recall interviews, which were made at the composer’s studio during the compositional process. The composer’s intuition paid significant role in the beginning of the compositional process, as well as in the moments of crises in the middle of the process. However, intuition prevailed during the whole process, only changing its function (from inventing new ideas into reorganising the old ones), and its form (from imagining into experienting, and from incubation into restructuring).
The experiental dimensions of the intuition of the same academic composer were studied by utilizing explication interview technique, developed by Vermersch (2009) to elicit fenomenal experience. The embodied intuition was detected in a situation, where the composer was interviewed just after an intense intuitive composing endeavour. The composer reported his intuitive mindset with expressions that bear reminiscence of ancient habits of mankind’s survival in the wild, and hunt for food. The composer’s state of physical arousal could be labelled “excitement”. The composer’s intuition was interpreted as a sophisticated form of the automatic and implisitic thinking that is older than reflective and analytic thinking. The study shows that a composer can´t rely on reflection and analytic thinking solely in creating a novel composition out of scratch – even if he can be categorized as analytical in terms of cognitive style, and as a modernist in terms of aesthetics. As within all human beings, much of a composer’s thinking is intuitive, weather he is aware of his sources of (intuitive) thinking, or not.


Afro-Acousmatic: Post DJ approaches to
the turntable/computer interface

Matt Wright

This lecture/demonstration focusses upon the ‘extended’ use of the turntable and DJ/Web Design software to create post-DJ, multichannel music that embraces the hip-hop, avant grade and ‘free’ traditions of turntablism, whilst presenting new avenues for turntablist gesture in web-based audio-visual installations. In the first part of the demonstration, an exploration of ‘extended’ turntable techniques will be presented, along with some of Wright’s notations for those gestures. The second part of the demonstration will focus upon the dialogue between the analogue turntable and the ‘extended’ use of commercially available DJ software, an approach Wright is constantly developing in his ‘Trance Map’ duo with world-leading saxophonist Evan Parker. Within this second section, asymmetric automation patterns will be used to spatialise live improvisation at the turntable, and the resultant spatio-rhythmic activity will provoke new realtime gestures from Wright, both through physical contact with the vinyl and through live sampling and hyper-speed remixing within software originally designed for DJ performances. The resultant actions and reactions will create a music that Wright feels both embraces and critiques the dance music heritage of the instruments used, and aims to spotlight the importance of the African diaspora on the development of electronic music, something that is gradually gaining ground in academic discourse.
The final part of the demonstration will present Wright’s ‘Totem for Gobi-New’ installation (a commission from the MATA Festival, New York in 2010, and created from samples of his journey through the Gobi desert, Mongolia, in 2009), a work that brings together turntablist techniques with interactive web-based animation and multichannel spatialisation.

Thinking in Performance
Murphy McCaleb


‘To play music is to think through music, to grapple with musical thoughts and create new musical ideas’ (McCaleb, 2014: 125). When musicians perform with each other, they draw upon a wealth of embodied knowledge they have developed through experience as performers and listeners. This knowledge enables them to infer musical intentions from (and possibly attribute meaning to) the performances emerging around them, allowing them to modify their own performances accordingly. However, there remain pressing questions about the nature and use of this performative knowledge. Most importantly, what strategies may musicians develop to decide amongst the range of possibilities afforded to them when they perform? There is the potential that those strategies, when combined, may suggest a contextually-dependent ‘logic’ to musical performance. To clarify what this may encompass, it is important to distinguish between the processes involved in thinking about music and thinking through music, a division between modes of thought which is most prominent in occupational psychology (Heron, 1999). Interspersed with instances of solo bass trombone performance, this paper allows me to propose that musical thought, particularly as evidenced through performance, is a form of embodied knowledge being expressed over time. The fundamental relationship between motion and sound production provides a starting point from which a richer understanding of the epistemology of musical knowledge may be revealed.

The performer-instrument assemblage
as a cybernetic system

Scott McLaughlin

In this presentation I will talk about my own music, which considers performer and instrument as an assemblage, equal agents in a flat ontology (Harman) resulting in a performative co-construction that is framed and guided by the composer’s text-score. Two works will form the core of the discussion, demonstrating the different approaches used for wind instruments and bowed string instruments, and placing them in musical and philosophical contexts.
As an example, in the series of pieces “there are neither wholes nor parts” for clarinet, the assemblage concept blurs the line between human and material agencies. The player’s mouth, tongue, vocal-tract etc. are all an extension of the instrument, as the clarinet is an extension of the performer’s body. The assemblage is a cybernetic system of forces and constraints, the instrument is embodied in the performer’s actions.
Here, the instrumental writing is limited to areas of insecure sound production. The continuous action of the performer is situated within a flow of instrumental responses that are difficult to predict; the responses tend to happen in “families” of possibility that allow a quasi-markovian form to the music. For wind and bowed-string instruments, the action is continuous, making this activity more analogous to surfing or skate-boarding than a binary “response”. As such, the performer activates and follows the “contours of material agency” (Pickering) of the instrument. In the material anthropology of Tim Ingold this is music-making “with” the instrument in the sense of “alongside” it. In a Heidegerrian sense, the player “reveals” material agency of the instrument: this can be simplistically opposed to the “enframing” of the instrument as a vehicle for notes and melodies.
This radical approach to instrumental writing replaces pre-conceived and “composerly” pitches and rhythms with the emergent sound of the performer-instrument assemblage as cybernetic system.

Dwelling In and Breaking Out

Reviving the Composer

Johannes Boer

This lecture-demonstration presents a two years project started Spring 2014 at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague by students of the departments for Composition and Early Music. It is supervised and guided by the composer Cornelis de Bondt and myself. The goal is to rethink historically informed performance on period instruments by a confrontation with the actuality of composition.
The subject of the project is the making of an opera about Claudio Monteverdi in the period 1607-1608, between the last performance of Orfeo and the première of Arianna. In his own words the most miserable as well as groundbreaking time of his life.
Instead of the usual scholarly approach this process will have the set up of a laboratory, investigating instant harmonic realizations, ornamentation and de–clamation in a dialogue over a 400 years gap.
In between the lines of the historical sources, which we consult for their explicit information, there is a lot of implicit knowledge to be found. Knowledge which gives indications about the world of the practitioners of those times, and which is in many ways akin to the tacit knowledge of todays performers. The re-embodiment of this knowledge will take place with the help of the composers who follow the ideals of Monteverdi, without making style copies. The musical language is related to the style of Monteverdi and contemporaries through the exclusive use of period instruments and early Seicento declamation, but as such an idiom of its own.
After the Early Music revival by playing period instruments and their repertoires, this is an attempt to bring a composer back to life. The ethical and aesthetical imperatives, which hopefully will accompany this effort, strive to bring awareness of the creative momentum in playing music that belongs as much to the past as to the current day.



The Body in the Music
Peter Spissky


The musical score plays a central role in the interpretation of the western classical music today. While the musical score has commonly been the “final station” for a musicologist, performers have developed two main strategies in relation to scores. Some hardly even know the actual score, using a modern edition which mirrors and imposes traditionally established interpretation onto the text of the composer. The other type of performers try to get closer to the original score, questioning the established tradition, or even further, into the context of pre-existing compositional models and relevant historical performance practice.
This signals two strategies of embodiment. The former type of performers, which we might call pragmatists, are embodying the traditional rendition of musical works as institutionalized in the Music Academies, while the latter, the idealists, try to find the “original” body behind the score, usually in an amalgam of historical information about composer’s intentions, historical instruments and performance practice.
The traditional pragmatists (moderns) have often accused by the idealists (HIP ) to play without genuine emotions, being too intellectual, too speculative, in short, playing without the real body.
Historical performance practice has gone through a major “ideological” turn towards the end of 20th century. New spirit was manifested as a decisive turn towards “musicking”, performativity, and embodied approach to historical information (Small, 1998; Butt, 2002)
In my presentation I will demonstrate in live examples on violin my experiments to develop an embodied reading of a musical score. When I read a notation of e.g. a Sarabande, how can I transcend the “sound-production” into “movement/gesture-production”? How can I discern the movement and gesture qualities inherent in the graphical structure of the notation?
On the theoretical background of recent studies on musical gesture, as well as more general concepts of embodiment, such as Johnson’s embodied gestalt image-schemata, or Bateson’s pattern of connection, I will explore the graphical images of the musical score (including the practical annotations of the performer) as metaphorical elaborations of basic bodily experiences, such as gravity, containment, force, and balance.


Discussion of [choreo] logy | carto [graphy]

and Choreo Graphia
Rebecca Chentinell / Marie Fahlin

Black Mountain College –
Practices and Models of Creativity

Anette Jael Lehmann

BMC was founded on the outskirts of a small North Carolinan mountain town in 1933 and closed down 24 years later in 1957. In my contribution I will try to highlight some aspects of modles of creativity unfolded at BMC, which included three factors: risk-taking, community life and experimentation. A syllabus of teaching was not a fixed entity but rather collectively elaborated and generated through a constant shift between various formats of perception and practice, presentation and representation. This understanding of education as co-creativity implies that learning as well as teaching are carried out as performative processes that unfold themselves while happening, consisting of an ever-changing set of processes that manifest themselves while they are acted out.Experiments at BMC were actions marking what Deleuze coined „the cleavage of causality“, expanding the pure cognitive notion of knowledge, which is based on understanding the logical chain of cause and effect or action and reaction. Experiments at BMC hardly determined knowledge, they rather offered fluid structures of experiences. For some, present conditions challenge the very category of creativity altogether, and give renewed urgency to the question of art’s and humanities purpose or “usefulness” in a period of an utalitarian educational regime under the sign of post-fordism. In which way could stimulating the discussion about Black Mountain work as an precursor to models of creativity and collaboration today? Which models of creativity serve best in overarching transdisciplinary concepts and practices to solve global problems such as homelessness, hunger or environmental disasters? Or on contrary is there a need for a profound criticism that tends to deemphasize or even disavow creativity as a relevant category altogether?
Presentation of Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations
and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away
Marie Fahlin / Nguyen
Thanh Thuy

Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away is a collaborative work for a choreographed musician by Swedish choreographer Marie Fahlin and the Vietnamese musician and performer Nguyen Thanh Thuy.
We have been working together since 2012 on several productions that are part of a series of explorations at the threshold between music and choreography in the international artistic research project Music in Movement, headed by the Malmö Academy of Music.
In the piece Vodou …, we’re exploring a field where our past bodies transmit, spill over on and vibrate with our present bodies. Creating a site of exhibited images, movements, music and text, a terrain where choreography merges, and collides, with other disciplines. We’re moving through memories of burdens, limits and deformations, re-formulating and transforming them to new vibrations – ex-changing you ex-changing me.
Our paper takes the work, and the process of making, Vodou … as point of departure and by looking at movements from different perspectives we will code and/or decode them in order to understand the layers of cultural meanings. The aim with our joint paper is also to further investigate the transmissions of movement between the two disciplines, this time through the medium of text in the form of a written and choreographed dialogue presented as a performance
event. A first installment of a series of performances will be presented in London during the CCLAP festival in November of this year. The premiere of the piece will take place during Tacit or Loud and the conceptual layers of the piece will be further developed in this paper.

Inde

Fabio Monni / Malin Astner

Can space be scaled by sound and body? How can the experienced space differ? How the body and the synchronized/desynchronized sound impulses reshape the stage of the performance?
The music composition is based on a six channels pink noise fast impulses, which interact with the dancer on three basic relations: connection – opposition – independence. The fast sound impulses create different geometries in the room (in between the speakers) and sustain and justify, by their level of synchronization, the presence of the physical performance. There is no stage and people will be free to move and explore the space of the performance, where the the audience’s perspective will be changed, from observer to observed
Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away


Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows
balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away
Nguyen Thanh Thuy / Marie Fahlin

Vodou vibrations sounds of memories of fields and burdens living in translations and broken bows balancing on plateaus while speaking to one self and scratching the surface of the raft while drifting away is a collaborative work for a choreographed musician by Swedish choreographer Marie Fahlin and the Vietnamese musician and performer Nguyen Thanh Thuy.
They’re exploring a field where their past bodies transmit, spill over on and vibrate with their present bodies. Creating a site of exhibited images, movements, music and text, a terrain where choreography merge, and collide, with the other disciplines. They’re moving through memories of burdens, limits and deformations, re-formulating and transforming them to new vibrations – ex-changing you ex-changing me.
Nguyen Thanh Thuy and Marie Fahlin have been working together since 2012 on several productions that are part of a series of explorations at the threshold between music and dance in the international artistic research project Music in Movement, headed by the Malmö Academy of Music.





 

 

 






Tacit or Loud

Festival program

– Inside/outside
– Post human computation
Arrival Cities: Hanoi
– The Fourth Dimension
– Vodou [...] 
– Il Se Tourna
Possible Worlds
– Face
– Inde
– Choreo Graphia
– Facet II
– Portraits

– Voices-of-No(i)sense
– [choreo] logy ⏐ carto [graphy]
– Reiterations of Dissent
– Body on street
– För den som i hemlighet lyssnar
– Gynoides project
– Violence and Pedagogy
– Knowing "I"?
– That’s all we shall no for truth
- Through Composition as Explanation
– Synsmaskinen

Symposium Nov 28-Dec 3
– Nov 28
– Nov 29
– Nov 30
– Dec 1
– Dec 2
– Dec 3

– Keynote speakers
– Presenters

Participation


Organization